Annie’s Crannies A Long-Time Dennis, MA Tradition

In 1994, Annie Walker decided to leave New York, come home to Cape Cod, and start doing what her grandfather once did: cultivate cranberries. In fact, she was able to purchase the exact bogs once owned by her grandfather, Ben. That was the beginning of Annie’s Crannies.cranberries

The well-known local business is headquartered in Dennis, which this year is celebrating the bicentennial of the cultivated cranberry, 1816-2016. While wild cranberries are native to the area, cultivating them wasn’t perfected until the early 19th Century. Dennis became the epicenter of cranberry production, contributing to the invention and standardization of harvesting, packaging and shipping of the product. In 1843, The Howes Variety of cranberry was developed, which was a boon for the industry. Grown only in Massachusetts, the Howes Variety ripens later in the fall, stays fresher longer, keeps better, is more rot resistant and can be picked wet (for juicing) or dry (for cooking). This is the kind Annie’s Crannies grows.

Annie’s Crannies is open during the weekends from Columbus Day to the first weekend in November. Stop by and you can learn about the dry picking method of cultivation, as well as about Annie’s bees, which produce honey for her bees wax candles, homemade blueberry and jams, and other products You’ll find these items, fresh cranberries and more at Annie’s Crannies stand and gift shop. One of the most popular items: a cookbook filled with wonderful cranberry recipes.

Annie’s Crannies
36 Scarsdale Road, Dennis
Open weekends only, October 15 to November 6, 2016
If you are worried about supplies lasting, you can always place an order online.

Cranberry pieWe use Annie’s Crannies cranberries in all of our cooking and baking at the Inn, including our guests’ favorite, cranberry pie. Come for a visit this fall and enjoy a taste of the Cape!

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